Anne’s picks of the June literature: Humans as Agents of Hydrologic Change

ResearchBlogging.orgA post by Anne JeffersonJune saw the publication of a number of excellent articles about the consequences of human activities on rivers and sea level and how those consequences aren’t always as straightforward as they might first appear.

Immerzeel, W., van Beek, L., & Bierkens, M. (2010). Climate Change Will Affect the Asian Water Towers Science, 328 (5984), 1382-1385 DOI: 10.1126/science.1183188

Where do 1 in 4 people live? Where do those people get their water? 1.4 billion people live in five river basins (Indus, Ganges, Brahmaputra, Yangtze, and Yellow) and those mighty rivers source some of their water in the Himalayas, where on-going climate change will have a big impact on glacier melt and seasonal precipitation. In this paper, Immerzeel and colleagues used the SRM hydrologic model and GCM outputs to simulate the years 2046-2065 under two different glacier extent scenarios, a “best-guess” and an extreme case where all glacier cover had disappeared. The five basins all behaved quite differently from each other, because each basin has a different topographic distribution. The Brahmaputra and Indus have the highest percent of glacier-covered area, and these two rivers will be the most severely impacted by projected climate change via decreases in late spring and summer streamflow, as reduced glacier melt is only partially offset by increased spring rains. Between these two basins, the authors estimate that the hydrologic changes will reduce the number of people who can be fed by 60 million people! On the other hand, basins with less reliance on meltwater will not be as bad off – in fact, the Yellow River is likely to experience an increase in spring streamflow and may be able to feed 3 million more people. To me this paper emphasizes the fact that the consequences of climate change are not going to be evenly dispensed across the world’s population and that we’ve really got an urgent task of figuring out how regional climate changes will cascade through hydrology, ecology, food security, disease, and almost every other aspect of the world on which we depend.

Fiedler, J., & Conrad, C. (2010). Spatial variability of sea level rise due to water impoundment behind dams Geophysical Research Letters, 37 (12) DOI: 10.1029/2010GL043462

Global reservoirs trap ~10,800 cubic kilometers of water – enough volume to reduce sea level by ~30 mm. But when large reservoirs are filled, the water weight locally depresses the Earth’s surface and increases local relative sea level. Thus, tide gages that are close to large reservoirs don’t record the true sea level effects of water impoundment – instead recording only about 60% of the true drop. This creates an added wrinkle in the estimation of global sea level rise over the last century, and Fiedler and Conrad compute that these reservoir effects on the geoid have caused an ~10% over-estimation in rates of sea level rise. The largest effects on sea level rise records are places where tide gages are near big reservoirs – like the east coast of North America. *

* Please note that I can’t read the full article of AGU publications (including WRR, JGR, and GRL) until July 2011 or the print issue arrives in my institution’s library. Summaries of those articles are generally based on the abstract only.

Categories: by Anne, climate science, hydrology, paper reviews
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Comments (2)

  1. Chris Rowan says:

    So if the effect of impoundment is to add a component of relative sea level rise, could this potentially explain why sea level is going up faster than is predicted by models?

  2. Passerby says:

    Thank-you for the great article on Asian river water supply.

    For you: last citation, full article
    http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/GG/FACULTY/…/Fiedler_Conrad_GRL2010.pdf

    The article immediately raised questions on the exceptional geoid elevation over Iceland, the effect of the new and very large reservoir system in the north and the recent uptick in seismic activity with purported deep magma movements.

    One of Eriks readers posted some interesting looking EQ map plots for this year.