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Ptychodus decurrens Shark Tooth Fossil

This image is of a Ptychodus decurrens (Agassiz) shark tooth fossil from the Cretaceous Period. Found in the Chalk of Kent England. Displayed at the British Natural History Museum London as of August 2016. Learn more here: http://www.chalk.discov...
Categories: British Natural History Museum; Cretaceous; england; shark tooth;

The Ghost of a River, Part II

Inkstain (John Fleck) | 23 April, 2017
Riding my bike late this morning, I stopped to admire a roadrunner in the trail.
Categories: New Mexico; water;

Here's the first installment in a new series at ImaGeo: dazzling imagery from the new GOES-16 weather satellite

ImaGeo | 23 April, 2017
With Earth Day just behind us, I've been inspired to start a new series here at ImaGeo: semi-regular posts showcasing the truly dazzling imagery now being produced by the GOES-16 weather satellite. It's now on its shakedown cruise, so to speak. Scie...
Categories: None

Denver March for Science

On Earth Day a global March for Science was organized and our main local march in Colorado was just down the street from our campus in Denver, so we met around 9:00 for coffee and bagels, then marched from the Science building to Civic Center Park.  We had professors, our EAS advisor Karen, students, alumni, and friends joining us in the march.  The march was one of the most positive and uplifting events I've ever attended.  Yes, us scientists are commonly introverted and not huge fans of crowds so we weren't your usual activist chanters.  Yes it was raining and in some cases snowing that morning.  Yes, we all are busy people and have things to do like piles of grading and revisions waiting for us back home, but thousands of science allies still came out to join the march.  It was truly impressive.  The police estimate that 13,000-15,000 marched with a total of about 20,000 attending at some point during the day.  We arrived at the park around 9:55 and enjoyed many of the signs before the march started off to our right.  We hopped in the long line and marched around downtown Denver in the wide streets that were graciously barricaded off for our safety.  Thanks for the Denver police and the volunteers for keeping us safe!
Categories: None

because science

Inkstain (John Fleck) | 23 April, 2017
My friend and collaborator Becky Bixby, a University of New Mexico biologist and the associate director of our Water Resources Program (she is our program's science brain), on why she wasn't at the March For Science yesterday:
Categories: New Mexico; water;

"Reform" won't solve our biggest problems

Resource Insights | 23 April, 2017
"You never cure structural defects; you let the system collapse."
Categories: None

Magnitude 5.3 Earthquake off the northeast coast of Mindanao Island, The Philippines.

Sciency Thoughts | 23 April, 2017
The United States Geological Survey recorded a Magnitude 5.3 Earthquake at a depth of 62.8 km about 12 km off the coast of the resort of Burgos in Agusan del Sur Province on northern Mindanao Island, Philippines, slightly before 9.20 am local time (slightly before 1.20 am GMT) on Sunday 23 April 2017. There are no reports of any casualties this event, though some minor damage has been reported in the municipality of Tago.
Categories: Agusan de Sur Province; Banda Sea Plate; Earthquakes; Geohazards; Mindanao Island; Pacific Plate; Philippine Plate; Philippines; Subductive Plate Margin; Sunda Plate;

Thousands Stand Up for Mankind’s Greatest Invention- Science

Thousands of scientists from around the world did something that seemed unimaginable a few years ago. They stood up and made their voices heard in defense of science. Thousands of scientists braved a steady light rain and cool temperatures to gather ...
Categories: Uncategorized; AGU; Climate Change; featured; March for Science; NASA; science education;

Terebrirostra lyra Fossil

This image is of a Terebrirostra lyra (J. Sowerby) brachiopod fossil from the Late Cretaceous Period (Lower Cenomanian). Found in the Warminster Beds Horningsham Wilts. England. Displayed at the British Natural History Museum London as of August ...
Categories: brachiopod; British Natural History Museum; Cretaceous; england;

Guiaphaenops deuvei: A new species of cave-dwellin Ground Beetle from Guangxi Province.

Sciency Thoughts | 23 April, 2017
Ground Beetles (Carabidae) are large, usually carnivorous Beetles, abundant across much of the globe. They are able to defend themselves by secreting noxious or caustic chemicals from glands on their abdomens (Bombardier Beetles are Carabids). Members of the genus Guiaphaenops specialist cave-dwellers known only from the limestone caves of Lingyun County in northwestern Guangxi Province, China. They show specialisations to cave life found in many animal groups, including the loss of their eyes and pigment.
Categories: Beetles; Biodiversity; Carabid Beetles; Carabidae; Cave Beetles; Caves; China; Coleoptera; Entomology; Ground Beetles; Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region; Linyun County; Taxonomy;

There's no place like home

ImaGeo | 23 April, 2017
A visual celebration of the home planet, starting with a view from Earth as seen from Saturn -- 870 million miles away -- and zooming in close On the morning of the first Earth Day, on April 20th, 1970, a friend and I boarded the IRT subway line...
Categories: None

Asteroid 2017 HG1 passes the Earth.

Sciency Thoughts | 23 April, 2017
Asteroid 2017 HG1 passed by the Earth at a distance of  1 078 000 km (2.80 times the average distance between the Earth and the Moon, 0.72% of the average distance between the Earth and the Sun), slightly before 10.00 pm GMT on Wednesday 16 April 2017. There was no danger of the asteroid hitting us, though had it done so it would have presented no threat. 2017 HG1 has an estimated equivalent diameter of 5-19 m (i.e. it is estimated that a spherical object with the same volume would be 5-19 m in diameter), and an object of this size would be expected to explode in an airburst (an explosion caused by superheating from friction with the Earth's atmosphere, which is greater than that caused by simply falling, due to the orbital momentum of the asteroid) in the atmosphere between 38 and 23 km above the ground, with only fragmentary material reaching the Earth's surface.
Categories: 2017 HG1; Asteroids; Aten Family Asteroids; Near Earth Asteroids; Solar System;

Wooster Geologists participate in the historic March For Science on Earth Day, 2017

Wooster Geologists | 22 April, 2017
Wooster, Ohio -- It was a chilly day downtown, but several hundred people gathered downtown for the national March For Science. We were one of over 500 local events across the country advocating for science awareness, education and funding. Thank y...
Categories: Uncategorized; climate change; paleoclimate; Wooster Geology;

Landslide kills two Bangladeshi migrant workers in Hulu Langat District, Peninsula Malaysia.

Sciency Thoughts | 22 April, 2017
Two Bangladeshi migrant workers have died after a landslide struck a house where they were staying in Hula Langat in Selangor State, Peninsula Malaysia, on Saturday 22 April 2017. The men were part of a group of 20 Bangladeshi and Indonesian workers working at a water treatment facility, who were staying in the building, when the incident occurred at about 2.00 am local time. The dead men have been identified as Rana, 40, and Masudrana, 22; two other men were injured in the event but have not yet been identified.
Categories: Geohazards; Hula Langat District; Landslips; Malaysia; Peninsula Malaysia; Selangor State; Southeast Asia; Tropical Forests;

Lecanicillium araneogenum: A new species of araneopathogenic Fungus from Guizhou Province, China.

Sciency Thoughts | 22 April, 2017
Araneopathogenic Fungi, i.e. Fungi that infect Spiders, have been documented since at least the early nineteenth century. Since the opisthosoma (abdomen) of Spiders lacks the toughened exoskeleton seen in Insects, Spiders are more vulnerable to pathogenic infection by Fungi, and arenopathogenic Fungi tend to be less specialised than entomopathogenic Fungi, often being closely related to species which attack completely different organisms. Members of the genus Lecanicillium, are Ascomycote Fungi which parasitize a variety of organisms, including Plants, Arthropods, Nematodes and other Fungi.
Categories: Arachnids; Arachnology; Araneopathogenic Fungi; Ascomycetes; Biodiversity; China; Fungi; Guizhou Province; Pathogens; Pathology; Spiders; Taxonomy;

Zealandia: a hitherto undiscovered continent?

Earth-Pages | 22 April, 2017
Mid-February 2017 saw the announcement in the world's media of what was made out to be a previously unsuspected, drowned continent. No, not in the Atlantic, but surrounding New Zealand. For geoscientists this was not 'fake news', but neither was it a surprise. Precise bathymetry based on satellite data rather than more conventional soundings from ships had long shown a substantial area (4.9 million km2) of the Coral and Tasman Seas between Australia and New Zealand and the Pacific to the immediate south-east of New Zealand was considerably less deep than the mean for the world's ocean floors. It shows up clearly on Google Earth.  The name 'Zealandia' had been suggested in 1995. The media flurry emerged from a paper published in the March/April 2017 issue of the Geological Society of America's on-line newsletter (Mortimer, N. and 10 others 2017. Zealandia: Earth's hidden continent. GSA Today, v. 27(3 March April 2107); doi:10.1130/GSATG321A.1), the phrase 'hidden continent' no doubt pulling in the hacks like mackerel to a piece of tin foil.
Categories: Tectonics;

Asteroid 2017 HJ passes the Earth.

Sciency Thoughts | 22 April, 2017
Asteroid 2017 HJ passed by the Earth at a distance of  135 700 km (0.35 times the average distance between the Earth and the Moon, 0.09% of the average distance between the Earth and the Sun), slightly before 5.45 am GMT on Wednesday 16 April 2017. There was no danger of the asteroid hitting us, though had it done so it would have presented no threat. 2017 HJ has an estimated equivalent diameter of 6-20 m (i.e. it is estimated that a spherical object with the same volume would be 6-20 m in diameter), and an object of this size would be expected to explode in an airburst (an explosion caused by superheating from friction with the Earth's atmosphere, which is greater than that caused by simply falling, due to the orbital momentum of the asteroid) in the atmosphere between 35 and 22 km above the ground, with only fragmentary material reaching the Earth's surface.
Categories: Apollo Group Asteroids; Asteroids; Near Earth Asteroids; Solar System;

March for Science in Perth Australia with Professor Phil Bland

The Traveling Geologist | 22 April, 2017
Professor Phil Bland is a ARC Laureate Fellow at Curtin University and lead scientist of the Desert Fireball Network. Him and his team use cutting edge ground-based camera systems to identifying and recovering meteorites with the goal of calculating the orbits of recovered meteorites to their source regions and parent bodies in the Solar System. He delivered the following speech at the March for Science event in Perth, Australia on 22 April 2017.
Categories: Phil Bland; Recent; March for Science; philosophy of science;

Toledo March for Science

Terra Central | 22 April, 2017
Off to Toledo to March for Science! Updates later this morning!
Categories: Uncategorized;

Explosion kills three workers at Rajasthan granite mine.

Sciency Thoughts | 22 April, 2017
Three workers have been killed and several more are being treated following an explosion at a granite mine near Dhavala in the Jalore District of Rajasthan on Monday 17 April 2017. The incident reportedly happened after one of the men attempted to cut a fuse wire with a rock rather than a pair of metal scissors. The dead men have been identified as Ramesh Kumar Koli, 40, and Jaisaram Koli, 32, both hailing from Sirohi district, and Mahendra Meena, 20, of Udaipur.
Categories: Granite; Health and Safety; India; Jalore District; Mining; Rajasthan;

There has been an Aquilopsing – have you felt it?

Cryptic Aquilops, by Brian Engh. Available as a poster print - see below.
Categories: Aquilops; Art; Brian Engh; James Herrmann; life restorations; stinkin' ornithischians; timely;

March for Science: Wellington, New Zealand

The Landslide Blog | 22 April, 2017
Today, my last day in New Zealand for this visit, I was honoured to be able to attend the Wellington March for Science. Its geographic position means that New Zealand has kicked off a global series of events - I think over 600 are planned.  The Wellington March for Science was  one of the three that happened this morning; Auckland follows this afternoon.  The event was well-attended in glorious, fabulous sunshine - Wellington was at its very best.  The crowd initially assembled at the Civic Square:
Categories: Photo gallery; featured; march for science;

The Bad Neighbour

Watershed Moments | 22 April, 2017
Last fall I spent a couple of hours one sunny afternoon digging holes in the gravel at the edge of our driveway and dropping in daffodil bulbs. The work paid off - in the past few weeks a mix of daffodil flowers have been nodding their yellow heads...
Categories: Watershed Moments 3.0; confrontation; moving; neighbours; noise; people; quiet;

Tropical Storm Arlene spins up in the north Atlantic — two months before the average date of the first named storm of hurricane season

ImaGeo | 22 April, 2017
Is climate change playing any role in an apparent lengthening of the hurricane season? It's way early for hurricane season to start, but that's precisely what happened yesterday with the formation of Tropical Storm Arlene in the far northern Atlant...
Categories: None

Schloenbachia varians Fossil

This image is of a Schloenbachia varians (J. Sowerby) ammonite fossil from the Late Cretaceous Period (Lower Cenomanian). Found in the Chalk Marl Varians Zone Evershot Dorset England. Displayed at the British Natural History Museum London as of A...
Categories: ammonite; British Natural History Museum; Cretaceous; england;

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