Stormwater management is all around you. Can you #SpotTheSCM?

realscientistsFor a week in October 2016, I had over 38,000 twitter followers as I took a turn hosting the @realscientists account. Of course, I spent a bunch of my time preaching the gospel of stormwater management. Here are tweets over two days synopsizing its history in 140 character bites. (Please note that the account is hosted by a different scientist each week. The image attached to these tweets is that of the current @realscientists host, not a crazy makeover of Anne.)

On Thursday of @highlyanne’s week @realscientists, she was putting finishing touches on a research proposal to do new, cool science on stormwater managment. She also wanted to get people to realize that stormwater managment is already happening in their neighborhoods, so #SpotTheSCM was born.

Categories: by Anne, hydrology, public science

What is stormwater? And how did we get to where we are today?

realscientists

For a week in October 2016, I had over 38,000 twitter followers as I took a turn hosting the @realscientists account. Of course, I spent a bunch of my time preaching the gospel of stormwater management. Here are tweets over two days synopsizing its history in 140 character bites.(Please note that the account is hosted by a different scientist each week. The image attached to these tweets is that of the current @realscientists host, not a crazy makeover of Anne.)

Categories: by Anne, hydrology

Kent State University’s Water and Land Symposium

A major focus for Anne’s Watershed Hydrology lab this fall has been preparing for the Kent State University Water and Land Symposium. She was the symposium co-chair (with lots of help from Biology’s Chris Blackwood), and all of the lab members were involved in some way.The symposium had about 400 attendees from universities, agencies, cities, non-profits, and the general public from throughout northeast Ohio. The symposium was a major piece of engagement for Anne’s stint as a AAAS Leshner Leadership Public Engagement Fellow. If you missed the event live or on twitter, here’s how it went down.

This year’s symposium occurred on October 5-6, 2016, and featured the theme of “Sustainability and Resilience on the Land-Water Continuum.”

Categories: academic life, by Anne, environment, hydrology, public science, society

A cross-section through the Earth

A post by Chris RowanOne of the first things I do in my introductory geology class is talk about the structure of the Earth. Knowing the names, composition and physical properties of the different layers is an important foundation for the rest of the course, which means I fret about presenting the information in a clear and memorable manner*. This year, I decided to try a slightly different approach to in the past: I started my lecture by drilling an imaginary borehole down into the Earth from our lecture room. We discussed how what we were drilling through changed as we crossed the Moho, the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary and the core-mantle boundary, and then crossed them again as we came up at the antipode of NE Ohio, which lies in the Indian ocean off Australia. Rather conveniently, this meant I had a good opportunity to discuss the differences between oceanic and continental lithosphere. It seemed to work pretty well. This is what the board looked like at the end of my lecture:

The whiteboard following my Earth Structure lecture

The whiteboard following my Earth Structure lecture. I ended up having to move a table which restricted my access to the right hand side of the board in the middle of the lecture. I’m sure my class thought this was very amusing.

I gave the students blank cross-sections to fill in with all the information as we went, but then I thought that maybe I could give my students an even better study resource. I took the rough figure I had created in Inkscape to work out how to arrange all the information in the cross-section, spruced it up and added text boxes explaining all the most important information, and voilà:

The Earth, Down From Kent, Ohio.

The Earth, Down From Kent, Ohio. Click here for a large version.

I think it turned out pretty well. Anyone who finds this useful is welcome to use it with attribution; if you want the .svg file so you can modify it to fit your location, get in touch.

*a constant worry for most of the course, to be honest.

Categories: basics, geology, geophysics, planets, teaching

Happy 100th Birthday, National Park Service!

A post by Chris RowanA post by Anne JeffersonA post by Geo KidAs the US National Park Service celebrates its Centennial this year, we thought we’d celebrate with it by sharing some of our favorite photos from the national parks we have visited in the era of digital photography.

Congaree National Park

Tall trees dwarfing people. River in foreground.

Hydrogeology students measuring streamflow and groundwater levels in the midst of a very impressive floodplain forest.

Crater Lake National Park

Spectacularly blue lake and sky with cinder cone rising in the center. trees in foreground.

Wizard Island, a volcano within a volcano.

Small brown hut on platform on rocks above lake.

The hydrologist very much enjoyed seeing the USGS lake level gage perched above Crater Lake’s cold, deep water.

Cuyahoga Valley National Park

We are super lucky to have a local National Park, especially one that is free to everyone, all year long. We keep finding new places to explore in this park, but here’s a picture from our most recent adventure.

 Ritchie Ledges in Cuyahoga Valley National Park

Anne and Geodog explore the Ritchie Ledges in Cuyahoga Valley National Park

Grand Teton National Park

Grand Teton National Park

Grand Teton is very pretty when the cloud base is high…

Grand Teton National Park

Anne and Geokid venture into the heart of Grand Teton.

Great Smokey Mountains National Park

Water flowing over ancient metamorphosed sediments, Great Smokey Mountains

Two of our favourite things: water flowing over ancient rocks, Great Smokey Mountains.

GeoKid never takes the boring route.

GeoKid never takes the boring route. Can’t imagine where she got that attitude from.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

A pahoehoe lava flow that has engulfed the (former) western slope of Pu'u Huluhulu. Photo: Chris Rowan, 2012.

Exploring a pahoehoe lava flow.

John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

The fossil rich Blue Basin. Anne's proud that she spotted a fossil embedded in the rock, and she doesn't want to think about how many she probably missed in passing.

The fossil rich Blue Basin. Anne’s proud that she spotted a fossil embedded in the rock, and she doesn’t want to think about how many she probably missed in passing.

Red and white striped badlands. Person in foreground at right.

The Painted Hills unit with its spectacular paleosols is near where Anne went to field camp and is where she went to celebrate defending her PhD (nearly 10 years ago now!)

Mammoth Cave National Park

Spectacular curtain of stalactites, Mammoth Cave National Park

Spectacular curtain of stalactites, Mammoth Cave National Park

GeoKid finds the going much easier than the adults in a slightly less Mammoth Part of Mammoth Cave.

GeoKid finds the going much easier than the adults in a slightly less Mammoth Part of Mammoth Cave.

Olympic National Park

Beach stack with Anne posing in a keyhole.

A field trip in Anne’s tectonic geomorphology class in graduate school provided an all too brief glimpse of the Olympics – and a chance to recover from her comprehensive qualifying exams.

Beach in foreground. Covered in huge logs in midground. Green forests in background.

So. Much. Wood. On Pacific Northwest Beaches.

Redwood National and State Park

Anne reaching up high at the base of a Redwood.

Big trees. Incredibly hard to get a sense of scale in a single photograph.

Slot canyon covered in ferns on the walls, with a gravel channel on the floor. Anne in background.

Fern Canyon is absolutely magical, and absolutely not a place I’d want to be in a rainstorm.

Rocky Mountain National Park

Anne in foreground. Snowcapped mountains in background.

In the valley below, there’s an alluvial fan formed during a catastrophic dam break flood. And behind that there are some mountains. This picture was taken on a Geological Society of America Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Kirk Bryan field trip, so Anne was in good company ignoring the mountains for the valleys.

Shenandoah National Park

Spectacular columnar basalts (and impressed students), Shenandoah National Park

Spectacular columnar basalts (and impressed students), Shenandoah National Park

Thomas Jefferson Memorial

TerraTyke explores the Jefferson Memorial

TerraTyke explores the Jefferson Memorial (run by the NPS. Totally counts.)

Yellowstone National Park

Allochthonous family looking the wrong way as a geyser does its thing

The first National Park outing for the Allochthonous family was a 2010 trip to Yellowstone (and Grand Teton). Not a bad starting point.

GeoKid examines hot spring algae

GeoKid learns that hot springs were worthy of close examination.

Algal mats at Grand Prismatic Spring

Colourful life thriving in hot, silica rich water at Grand Prismatic Spring.

Yosemite National Park

El Capitan, with conifers in foregound.

Gorgeous granite galore.

That’s 15 national parks in the last 12 years. More in the pre-digital era. But so many more yet to see. This year, GeoKid is in 4th grade, which means that she gets to take part in the fabulous “Every Kid in a Park” program that gives free park passes to families of every fourth grader. Where should we go next?

Categories: geology, photos