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rivers

Anthems for junior geology enthusiasts

The Kent State University Child Development Center kindergarten class is coming to visit the Geology Department this morning. They are going to get a chance to work on the Emriver stream table, figure out the the difference between fossils and rocks, and compare their stride length to a dinosaur’s. At …

Mapping Ohio

These maps have come in awfully handy as I’m getting my bearings on Ohio’s geography, geology, and hydrology. Physiographic regions of Ohio Bedrock geology map Glacial map of Ohio Ohio 8-digit hydrologic units Ohio’s rivers (Figure B-1 on page 8 of the 2012 Integrated Report by Ohio EPA has more …

A nice British video explaining the connection between rivers and groundwater. I can’t get the embed to work, so you’ll have to click through to watch: http://www.groundwateruk.org/How-Rivers-Work-Role-of-Groundwater.aspx This is why I say I study rivers AND groundwater – if you want to understand how water moves through a watershed, you’ve got to …

New paper: Seasonal versus transient snow and the elevation dependence of climate sensitivity in maritime mountainous regions

Jefferson, A. 2011. Seasonal versus transient snow and the elevation dependence of climate sensitivity in maritime mountainous regions, Geophysical Research Letters, 38, L16402, doi:10.1029/2011GL048346. Abstract: In maritime mountainous regions, the phase of winter precipitation is elevation dependent, and in watersheds receiving both rain and snow, hydrologic impacts of climate change …

Floodwaters rising on the Red River

Cross posted at Highly Allochthonous Fargo, North Dakota is coming out of its 3rd snowiest winter since 1885. Snow continued to fall into late March, and daytime temperatures have only been above freezing for few weeks. At night, it’s still below freezing, though starting tomorrow night the forecast calls for …

A continental divide that runs through a valley

14,000 years ago there was direct connection between what is now the Red River basin and the Minnesota River basin. Today, there’s a continental divide – with the Red flowing toward Hudson Bay and the Minnesota flowing toward the Mississippi and Gulf of Mexico. But what a strange continental divide it is – for it runs through the former outlet of Lake Agassiz, in what is now known as the Traverse Gap. This divide is not so much a high point in the landscape, but a just-not-quite-as-low area.

Flooding in Pakistan

For the past two weeks, unusually heavy monsoon rains have deluged Pakistan, resulting in flooding and landslides. Pakistan is heavily populated all along the Indus River valley, so this is a slow-moving disaster of epic proportions. The latest news reports estimate that flooding has displaced 14 million people – more …

Anne's picks of the literature: river and floodplain sediments

These four papers all attempt to understand what controls the sediments that make up the streambed and floodplain and that get preserved in the geologic record. White et al. look at how riffle positions are governed by valley width variations, while Jerolmack and Brzinski find striking similarities in grain size transitions observed in rivers and dune fields. Hart et al. examine the relationship between glacial advances and downstream sediment deposition, while Sambrook Smith et al. investigate the sedimentological record of floods.