CUAHSI cyberseminars on Urban Streams

Green infrastructure, groundwater and the sustainable city Larry Band, Institute for the Environment at University of North Carolina Watershed context and the evolution of urban streams Derek Booth, Bren School of Environmental Management at UC Santa Barbara The Little Stringybark Creek project Tim Fletcher, University of Melbourne Contaminants of emerging …

Mammals March Madness – Friends of the Watershed Hydrology Lab pool

Come one, come all to the internet phenom, the most nerdy fun alternative march madness event ever: Mammals March Madness 2016! http://mammalssuck.blogspot.com/2016/02/mammal-march-madness-2016.html?m=1 Will the snow leopard be upset by the Siberian chipmunk in the first round?* Unlikely. But what happens when the #8 seed Schoolcraft College Ocelots face the #9 …

Anne’s reads in 2016

For the second year in a row, I’ll be keeping track of the academic literature I read. This storify will serve as a roughly reverse chronological listing of that literature, with occasional color commentary.

Scroll to the bottom to find out how it went and what I read in 2015.

2015 in review (with pictures)

2015 was an incredible year of scientific adventures for the Watershed Hydrology lab. Here are some of our highlights:   These Piper diagrams show the geochemistry of flowback water from fracking operations in the Marcellus shale of Pennsylvania, relative to literature values of groundwater contaminated with road salt, septic waste, and animal …

Research on street-scale bioretention featured in the news

Our work with Cleveland Metroparks on assessing the effects of retrofitting bioretention cells, rain gardens, and rain barrels into residential neighborhoods in Parma, Ohio has been been featured in several news stories thanks to a nice press release issued by Kent State. On November 20th, Cleveland.com ran the story: “Kent …

How low will they go? The response of headwater streams in the Oregon Cascades to the 2015 drought

From a distance, Anne has been watching an incredibly unusual summer play out in the Pacific Northwest, following a winter with far less snow (but more rain) than usual. Folks on the ground in Oregon have been collecting data on the response of the Oregon Cascades streams to “no snow, …