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precipitation

Sensitivity of precipitation isotope meteoric water lines and seasonal signals to sampling frequency and location

The Watershed Hydrology lab will be out in force for the Geological Society of America annual meeting in Vancouver in October. Over the next few days, we’ll be sharing the abstracts of the work we are presenting there. SENSITIVITY OF PRECIPITATION ISOTOPE METEORIC WATER LINES AND SEASONAL SIGNALS TO SAMPLING …

Stormwater control measures modify event-based stream temperature dynamics in urbanized headwaters

Next week, the Watershed Hydrology Lab will be well represented at the CUAHSI 2014 Biennial Colloquium. We’ll be presenting four posters, so here come the abstracts… Stormwater control measures modify event-based stream temperature dynamics in urbanized headwaters Grace Garner1, Anne Jefferson2*, Sara McMillan3, Colin Bell4 and David M. Hannah1 1School …

Sensitivity of precipitation isotope meteoric water lines and seasonal signals to sampling frequency and location

This work is being conducted by undergraduate lab member, Allison Reynolds. Allison presented her work as part of the CUAHSI/USGS Virtual Workshop on applications of laser specs to hydrology and biogeochemistry. From that workshop, she will have an extended abstract published in a USGS open file report, and her poster …

Radar precipitation measurements

Radar is increasingly used to measure precipitation in hydrologic science applications. It’s handy because it can be both frequent and areally distributed. This NWS newsletter does a great job of going over the basics of how weather radar can be used to derive rainfall rates and totals. This page gives a …

After the storm

Cross-posted at Highly Allochthonous It’s been quite a week. My home in northeastern Ohio got off lightly from “Superstorm” Sandy, compared to places closer to the Atlantic seaboard and in the Caribbean. But still, over 250,000 people lost power due to high wind, especially in Cuyahoga and Lorain counties along …

Storm Comin’

Cross-posted at Highly Allochthonous If you live in the eastern 1/3 of the US and you haven’t started paying attention to Hurricane Sandy, today is THE day. This odd late-season storm is going to hit the northeastern and mid-Atlantic coast hard, having already stormed across the Caribbean, killing at least …

New publication: Coevolution of hydrology and topography on a basalt landscape in the Oregon Cascade Range, USA

How does a landscape go from looking like this… to looking like this? Find out in my new paper in Earth Surface Processes and Landforms. Hint: Using a chronosequence of watersheds in the Oregon Cascades, we argue that the rates and processes of landscape evolution are driven by whether the …