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hyporheos

Abstract: Evaluating restoration effects on transient storage and hyporheic exchange in urban and forested streams

A third abstract from our group for the 2012 Geological Society of America meeting: EVALUATING RESTORATION EFFECTS ON TRANSIENT STORAGE AND HYPORHEIC EXCHANGE IN URBAN AND FORESTED STREAMS OSYPIAN, Mackenzie L., Civil Engineering, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28262, mosypian@uncc.edu, JEFFERSON, Anne J., Department of Geology, Kent …

Spring Break: tracer injection in Beaver Dam Creek

Spring Break: tracer injection in Beaver Dam Creek

Spring Break: tracer injection in Beaver Dam Creek

Some of our students are in the field this week, injecting Cl- and Br- into a restored reach and an unrestored reach in tributaries of Beaver Dam Creek. Our goal is to understand the role of wood jams versus restoration structures in promoting stream-hyporheic exchange.

In the photo are Alea, Xueying, and Mackenzie. Photo by Brittany. They’ve got it so capably handled they didn’t even need Sandra or I out there with them today, but I’m going tomorrow for an excuse to be in the field as much as anything.

Spring Break: tracer injection in Beaver Dam Creek

Some of our students are in the field this week, injecting Cl- and Br- into a restored reach and an unrestored reach in tributaries of Beaver Dam Creek. Our goal is to understand the role of wood jams versus restoration structures in promoting stream-hyporheic exchange.

In the photo are Alea, Xueying, and Mackenzie. Photo by Brittany. They’ve got it so capably handled they didn’t even need Sandra or I out there with them today, but I’m going tomorrow for an excuse to be in the field as much as anything.

Spring Break: tracer injection in Beaver Dam Creek

Some of our students are in the field this week, injecting Cl- and Br- into a restored reach and an unrestored reach in tributaries of Beaver Dam Creek. Our goal is to understand the role of wood jams versus restoration structures in promoting stream-hyporheic exchange.

In the photo are Alea, Xueying, and Mackenzie. Photo by Brittany. They’ve got it so capably handled they didn’t even need Sandra or I out there with them today, but I’m going tomorrow for an excuse to be in the field as much as anything.

Ralph McGee and Cameron Moore will graduate next week!

Major congratulations to two Watershed Hydrogeology Lab graduate students who have finished writing their MS theses and will defend them next week. Ralph McGee and Cameron Moore both started in our MS in Earth Science program in August 2009, and less than two years later they have each completed impressive …

My picks of the September literature

Haggerty, Roy; Martí, Eugènia; Argerich, Alba; von Schiller, Daniel; Grimm, Nancy B. 2009. Resazurin as a “smart” tracer for quantifying metabolically active transient storage in stream ecosystems J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 114, No. G3, G03014 (Roy will be talking about this work in our session at the GSA Annual Meeting …

GSA Abstract: Groundwater contributions to headwater streams on fractured rock in the North Carolina Piedmont and Blue Ridge

The Watershed Hydrogeology Lab is going to be busy at this year’s Geological Society of America annual meeting in Portland, Oregon in October. We’ve submitted four abstracts for the meeting, I am co-convening a session, and I’ll be helping lead a pre-meeting field trip. The abstract below pulls together some …

People just keep publishing interesting stuff.

Fiorillo, F. 2009. Spring hydrographs as indicators of droughts in a karst environment. Journal of Hydrology 373: 290-301. Rosenberry, D.O. and J. Pitlick. 2009. Effects of sediment transport and seepage direction on hydraulic properties at the sediment–water interface of hyporheic settings. Journal of Hydrology 373: 377-391. Gresswell, R. et al. …