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Alea Tuttle to defend her M.S. on Monday, April 30th

Earth Science M.S. student, Alea Tuttle, will defend her thesis POST-PROJECT EVALUATIONS OF URBAN STREAM RESTORATION SITES IN THE SOUTHEASTERN PIEDMONT: STREAMBED SEDIMENT DENITRIFICATION AND GEOMORPHIC COMPLEXITY on Monday, April 30th, 2012 at 9:30 am in the 4th floor conference room of McEniry Hall on the UNC Charlotte campus. Alea …

Spring Break: tracer injection in Beaver Dam Creek

Spring Break: tracer injection in Beaver Dam Creek

Spring Break: tracer injection in Beaver Dam Creek

Some of our students are in the field this week, injecting Cl- and Br- into a restored reach and an unrestored reach in tributaries of Beaver Dam Creek. Our goal is to understand the role of wood jams versus restoration structures in promoting stream-hyporheic exchange.

In the photo are Alea, Xueying, and Mackenzie. Photo by Brittany. They’ve got it so capably handled they didn’t even need Sandra or I out there with them today, but I’m going tomorrow for an excuse to be in the field as much as anything.

Spring Break: tracer injection in Beaver Dam Creek

Some of our students are in the field this week, injecting Cl- and Br- into a restored reach and an unrestored reach in tributaries of Beaver Dam Creek. Our goal is to understand the role of wood jams versus restoration structures in promoting stream-hyporheic exchange.

In the photo are Alea, Xueying, and Mackenzie. Photo by Brittany. They’ve got it so capably handled they didn’t even need Sandra or I out there with them today, but I’m going tomorrow for an excuse to be in the field as much as anything.

Spring Break: tracer injection in Beaver Dam Creek

Some of our students are in the field this week, injecting Cl- and Br- into a restored reach and an unrestored reach in tributaries of Beaver Dam Creek. Our goal is to understand the role of wood jams versus restoration structures in promoting stream-hyporheic exchange.

In the photo are Alea, Xueying, and Mackenzie. Photo by Brittany. They’ve got it so capably handled they didn’t even need Sandra or I out there with them today, but I’m going tomorrow for an excuse to be in the field as much as anything.

Brandon Blue proposal defense, Thursday, 9:30 am

Watershed Hydrogeology Lab student Brandon Blue will defend his project proposal on Thursday morning, March 1st, at 9:30 am in Cameron room 250. Brandon’s proposal is titled: Seasonal Urban Stream Temperature Response to Storm Events Within the Northern Piedmont of North Carolina. Please join us for the public presentation of the …

Recent Happenings in the Watershed Hydrogeology Lab

Some highlights from the end of last year and the beginning of the new year in our research group: Alea successfully defended her thesis proposal in November, and is hoping to finish the thesis itself this spring. We all benefited from time with our UCSB collaborators in December, and  we’ve …

Cynthia Barnett, award winning water journalist and author, to speak at UNC Charlotte

I’m excited to announce that Cynthia Barnett will be speaking on campus next week. She’s an outstanding thinker and writer about water conservation, particularly as it pertains to the eastern United States, where our sense of water-richness has lulled us into complacency. From the press release: Award-winning journalist and author …

New paper: Seasonal versus transient snow and the elevation dependence of climate sensitivity in maritime mountainous regions

Jefferson, A. 2011. Seasonal versus transient snow and the elevation dependence of climate sensitivity in maritime mountainous regions, Geophysical Research Letters, 38, L16402, doi:10.1029/2011GL048346. Abstract: In maritime mountainous regions, the phase of winter precipitation is elevation dependent, and in watersheds receiving both rain and snow, hydrologic impacts of climate change …

Anne is a "Strange Quark"

Wow! I won the “strange quark” (2nd place) award in a science writing contest, hosted by Three Quarks Daily, for blogging about the Mississippi River, floods, levees, and the illusion of control. As I wrote in the comments at 3QD: Wow! I never thought I’d actually win something for writing …

Anne in the news

Flooding along the Mississippi River Last week, I wrote a post for the Scientific American Guest Blog on “Levees and the Illusion of Flood Control,” about the ways that while levees around individual communities may be good, the systematic leveeing of entire waterways is a bad long-term strategy. On Friday, …