Tag Archives: fluvial geomorphology

Scenic Saturday: Upper Mississippi Islands

The last few weeks have seen me overwhelmingly busy with #sciwrite, #gradingjail, #proposalpurgatory, and #deathbydataanalysis, and it doesn’t look like I’ll come up for air for a little while longer. But to give the blog a little freshening, and help … Continue reading

Categories: by Anne, geomorphology, photos

Scenic Saturday: The Temple

Right now I have a graduate student working on a project to understand the effects of stream restoration in altering patterns of groundwater-stream exchange. She’s working in four stream reaches with varying restoration patterns and watershed land uses. In one … Continue reading

Categories: by Anne, fieldwork, geomorphology, hydrology, photos

Scenic Saturday: Wood in Streams

One of our field trips in my Fluvial Processes class takes the students to the lower reaches of Mallard Creek, the urban stream that drains the northern portion of Charlotte, including our campus. For most of its length, Mallard Creek … Continue reading

Categories: by Anne, environment, geomorphology, photos, publication, science education

Simulating river processes…ooh shiny, stream table!

I’ve got a shiny new Emriver Em2 river processes simulator (i.e., stream table), thanks to departmental equipment funds and enthusiastic colleagues. I’ve been on sabbatical this semester and away from campus, so I haven’t had a chance to play with … Continue reading

Categories: by Anne, geomorphology, public science, science education

Anne’s picks of the literature: river and floodplain sediments

These four papers all attempt to understand what controls the sediments that make up the streambed and floodplain and that get preserved in the geologic record. White et al. look at how riffle positions are governed by valley width variations, while Jerolmack and Brzinski find striking similarities in grain size transitions observed in rivers and dune fields. Hart et al. examine the relationship between glacial advances and downstream sediment deposition, while Sambrook Smith et al. investigate the sedimentological record of floods. Continue reading

Categories: by Anne, geomorphology, paper reviews