Where is Anne at AGU?

A post by Anne JeffersonI’ve abandoned my family for the week and flown to San Francisco to join ~26,000 geoscientists at this year’s American Geophysical Union meeting. It’s a big, spectacular, and exciting meeting, and I might have gotten a little too excited about attending after a few years absence. As a result, I said yes to a few things…. and that has given me a pretty busy schedule over the next few days.

Monday

I’m giving a talk in the session on Water, Energy, and Urban Systems II (H12E) in Moscone West 3016 from 10:50-11:05. My talk is on “A Neighborhood-Scale Green Infrastructure Retrofit: Experimental Results, Model Simulations, and Resident Perspectives” and represents an attempt to summarize three papers worth of work into a 12 minute talk. It’ll be great, and this work is the main reason I was desperate to come to AGU this year.

From 1-2 pm, I’ll be participating in the Sharing Science mentoring meet-up (Moscone West 2001A), where I am paired with a super-awesome PhD student interested in science communication and public engagement. I think I’m supposed to mentor her, but I’m blown away by the great work she’s already doing.

From 4-6 pm, I’m part of the Social Dimensions of Geoscience Pop-ups (Moscone West 2001A), which are a fantastic series of 5 minute presentations, which will be video recorded in case you want to watch later. Mine is at 5:17 pm and is on “Social Media for Community Building Among Geoscientists from Under-represented Groups.”

From 6-8 pm, I’m going to relax and see friends at the Earth Science Women’s Network Reception at The Children’s Creativity Museum Imagination Lab, if I can figure out where that is. Will I see you there?

I promise you that no other day is quite as crazy as Monday.

Tuesday

In the morning, I’m helping present a poster (but all credit goes to Mika McKinnon for doing every single bit of work on it) in the session on Progress toward an Inclusive and Welcoming Geoscience Community: Addressing Harassment and Improving Workplace Climate Posters (ED21D) in the Moscone South Poster Hall. Our poster is on “Staying Safe While Doing Science in Public: Emerging Best Practices for Social Media” and is ED21D-0796.

Over the lunch hour, I’m giving a 1-slide, 3 minute lightning talk as part of the Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) Program Town Hall from 12:30 – 1:30pm in Moscone West – 3022. I’ll be making the case for why the future of CZOs must include urban areas.

In the afternoon, I’m going to take a deep breath, maybe go to a few talks, and probably prep for the second half of my week.

Wednesday

I’ll be just an ordinary conference attendee in the morning, but in the afternoon I’m excited to moderate an Earth Science Women’s Network panel and discussion on Success in Scientific Publishing and Outreach from 2-4 pm in San Francisco Marriott Marquis – Golden Gate A.

Thursday

In the morning, I’m convening one of several groundwater-surface water sessions, but mine is the bright and early one: “H41H: Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions: Identifying and Integrating Physical, Biological, and Chemical Processes across Scales I” from 8:00-10:00 in Moscone West 3020.

Friday

I’ll wrap up my week with a talk about hydrology education in ED52A: Tools and Methods for Data Driven Education in the Water Sciences II. My talk “Data-driven Approaches to Teaching Stable Isotopes in Hydrology and Environmental Geochemistry” (ED52A-07) will discuss work we’ve done to develop curriculum and assess the effects of teaching format on student outcomes. You can find me talking from 11:50-12:05 in Moscone South 309.

After my talk I’ll be taking a redeye back to Ohio, hopefully getting a few hours of much needed sleep and then performing in a piano recital on Sunday afternoon. I think that’s called work-life balance.

I hope you’ll follow along on Twitter as I broadcast morsels of AGU science and my madcap adventures in over-commitment as the Moscone wi-fi and my phone battery allow.

Categories: by Anne, conferences

Stormwater management is all around you. Can you #SpotTheSCM?

realscientistsFor a week in October 2016, I had over 38,000 twitter followers as I took a turn hosting the @realscientists account. Of course, I spent a bunch of my time preaching the gospel of stormwater management. Here are tweets over two days synopsizing its history in 140 character bites. (Please note that the account is hosted by a different scientist each week. The image attached to these tweets is that of the current @realscientists host, not a crazy makeover of Anne.)

On Thursday of @highlyanne’s week @realscientists, she was putting finishing touches on a research proposal to do new, cool science on stormwater managment. She also wanted to get people to realize that stormwater managment is already happening in their neighborhoods, so #SpotTheSCM was born.

Categories: by Anne, hydrology, public science

What is stormwater? And how did we get to where we are today?

realscientists

For a week in October 2016, I had over 38,000 twitter followers as I took a turn hosting the @realscientists account. Of course, I spent a bunch of my time preaching the gospel of stormwater management. Here are tweets over two days synopsizing its history in 140 character bites.(Please note that the account is hosted by a different scientist each week. The image attached to these tweets is that of the current @realscientists host, not a crazy makeover of Anne.)

Categories: by Anne, hydrology

Kent State University’s Water and Land Symposium

A major focus for Anne’s Watershed Hydrology lab this fall has been preparing for the Kent State University Water and Land Symposium. She was the symposium co-chair (with lots of help from Biology’s Chris Blackwood), and all of the lab members were involved in some way.The symposium had about 400 attendees from universities, agencies, cities, non-profits, and the general public from throughout northeast Ohio. The symposium was a major piece of engagement for Anne’s stint as a AAAS Leshner Leadership Public Engagement Fellow. If you missed the event live or on twitter, here’s how it went down.

This year’s symposium occurred on October 5-6, 2016, and featured the theme of “Sustainability and Resilience on the Land-Water Continuum.”

Categories: academic life, by Anne, environment, hydrology, public science, society

A cross-section through the Earth

A post by Chris RowanOne of the first things I do in my introductory geology class is talk about the structure of the Earth. Knowing the names, composition and physical properties of the different layers is an important foundation for the rest of the course, which means I fret about presenting the information in a clear and memorable manner*. This year, I decided to try a slightly different approach to in the past: I started my lecture by drilling an imaginary borehole down into the Earth from our lecture room. We discussed how what we were drilling through changed as we crossed the Moho, the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary and the core-mantle boundary, and then crossed them again as we came up at the antipode of NE Ohio, which lies in the Indian ocean off Australia. Rather conveniently, this meant I had a good opportunity to discuss the differences between oceanic and continental lithosphere. It seemed to work pretty well. This is what the board looked like at the end of my lecture:

The whiteboard following my Earth Structure lecture

The whiteboard following my Earth Structure lecture. I ended up having to move a table which restricted my access to the right hand side of the board in the middle of the lecture. I’m sure my class thought this was very amusing.

I gave the students blank cross-sections to fill in with all the information as we went, but then I thought that maybe I could give my students an even better study resource. I took the rough figure I had created in Inkscape to work out how to arrange all the information in the cross-section, spruced it up and added text boxes explaining all the most important information, and voilà:

The Earth, Down From Kent, Ohio.

The Earth, Down From Kent, Ohio. Click here for a large version.

I think it turned out pretty well. Anyone who finds this useful is welcome to use it with attribution; if you want the .svg file so you can modify it to fit your location, get in touch.

*a constant worry for most of the course, to be honest.

Categories: basics, geology, geophysics, planets, teaching