Category Archives: hydrology

One recipe for flooding: Take a tropical cyclone and add steep topography

The past few weeks have brought two tropical cyclones* to the eastern seaboard of the United States. They serve nicely to illustrate the topographic controls on flood generation that we were been talking about in my Fluvial Processes class recently. … Continue reading

Categories: by Anne, geohazards, geomorphology, hydrology

Scenic Saturday: Ropy pahoehoe on a biogenic beach

In this inaugural Scenic Saturday post, I offer up very happy volcano/landscape nerd enjoying the stunning geologic scenery on Isabella, Gal├ípagos Islands, July 2011. I was there as a participant in the Chapman Conference on the Gal├ípagos as a Laboratory … Continue reading

Categories: by Anne, geomorphology, hydrology, photos, volcanoes

Flooding around the world (3 July edition)

Here is a brief update on the floods I covered in the last edition of flooding around the world. Note that there has also been flooding in Xiengkoung, Viengtian, Boolikhamxay, and Xayaboury provinces of Laos, as a result of heavy … Continue reading

Categories: by Anne, geohazards, hydrology

Flooding around the world (26 June edition)

Since the last edition of flooding around the world, flooding along the Mississippi River has mostly subsided, but flooding continues along the Missouri River and in China. Several new flood wetspots have also popped up, as the image below from … Continue reading

Categories: by Anne, geohazards, hydrology

When a tree falls in a stream, there’s always something around to make use of it.

Allochthonous may have some obscure usage related to rocks, but in ecology, allochthonous material is a major concept that underpins thinking about nutrient cycling and food web dynamics. In its most general definition, allochthonous material is something imported into an … Continue reading

Categories: by Anne, environment, hydrology, photos